Plants Plants & Flowers

Rotating Plant Growing

Rotating Plant Growing

Rotating Plant Growing
Rotating Plant Growing

The vegetables in your garden don’t have the same nutritive needs and their roots don’t need to grow to the same depth in the soil.   It is, therefore, necessary to rotate plant growing, practice known as plant rotation.  Growing the same plant in the same place tires out the soil over the years and also provokes the development of diseases.

Plant rotation consists of changing, over several years, the types of vegetables grown according to their specific needs.  To carry out this practice, you should divide your patch into four different plots in which you will then rotate cultivation.

Plot 1

Plant leaf vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, corn salad or cabbage, and also Solanaceae like potatoes or tomatoes.  These vegetables need soil which contains a lot of nutritive elements,  nitrogen in particular.

Plot 2

Plant bulb like onions and garlic along with root vegetables like radish, carrots, beetroot or turnips, which all are capable of searching for nitrogen deep in the soil.

Plot 3

Plant grain vegetables like string beans or butter beans, which are capable of enriching the soil in nitrogen.  Fruit vegetables like melons and pumpkins may also be grown here.

Plot 4

Leave this plot fallow by planting organic, soil-enriching fertilizers like clover, alfalfa or mustard.

In the second year, put the plants in the first plot into the second plot, the plants in the second plot into the third, the plants in the third into the fourth and the plants in the fourth into the first.  The main thing is not to plant the same vegetable in the same plot two years running.  You should also dig dung and/or well-decomposed compost into the soil in Spring.

You can plant vivacious vegetables like artichokes, rhubarb or asparagus permanently in a fifth plot.

 

Follow us on: TwitterFacebookPinterestInstagram

 

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.