Growing Plants from Cuttings – Gardening Tips

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Growing Plants from Cuttings – Gardening Tips

Growing Plants from Cuttings - Gardening TipsGrowing Plants from Cuttings – Gardening Tips

Gardening – Propagation

Propagation

Propagation through cuttings is a popular option for propagating cultivars to an identical form and are used for trees and shrubs. Pull gently on the stem to test for rooting; it has rooted if lodged firmly. Cuttings can be made in stem-, leaf- and root form. Stem cuttings are the method most often used of hardwood-, soft tip- or semi-hardwood types.

To increase your plant population through propagation is challenging, satisfying and cheaper than buying from nurseries. The different forms of propagation are:

Seed is a popular option and most plants can be multiplied by sowing. In some cases it is better to buy seed from a reputable seed-house; for certain cultivated plants’ seed will not result in an identical plant to the parent.

Seed can be sown in a tray with 1 part sand, 1 part peat moss and 1 part sieved topsoil.
Scatter seed over the growing medium and cover to a depth of its own diameter.
Water with a fine spray and cover with black plastic or hay.
Remove coverage with the first appearance of germination.

Fine seed should be sown in sand mixed with peat moss. Mix equal quantities of sand and seed thoroughly and spread over the firmed-down, growing medium (in a plastic seed tray). Immerse the tray into shallow water and let the soil suck moisture up. Remove from water when the upper layer of soil darkens and cover with newspaper. Remove newspaper after germination and place tray in a garden frame. Provide 50% shade by using a cloth over the frame. Using chicken wire stretched around/over upright poles and shade cloth can make a simple garden frame.

Prick out seedlings when they are ±2cm high or have two true leaves and plant out in containers, ensuring adequate spacing.

The planting out in the garden should be done when the young ones are growing strong, differing in heights from plant to plant.

Cuttings are a popular option for propagating cultivars to an identical form and are used for trees and shrubs. Pull gently on the stem to test for rooting; it has rooted if lodged firmly. Cuttings can be made in stem-, leaf- and root form. Stem cuttings are the method most often used of hardwood-, soft tip- or semi-hardwood types.

Semi-hardwood cuttings are taken during summer and will take 3 – 8 weeks to root.
Make the cutting 15cm long, with a bud near the top and place in a pot containing river sand, protect from sunlight and keep moist.

Hardwood cuttings are taken before the growing season and will take ±5 weeks to root. Ensure the top is just above a bud. Place these cuttings in river sand with 5cm emerging above the sand. Keep moist, mulch with hay and provide sun protection.

Soft tip cuttings should be 10cm long and taken in spring. Rooting may take place within in week to two weeks and keep constantly moist. The bottom cut should be made just beneath a node and the growing tip removed. Remove the foliage of- and plant the lower half in a pot with river sand.

Leaf cuttings are probably the method least used, except in the case of certain plants where it’s the only option of cutting-propagation. With a sharp knife, make cuts into the veins at broad intervals before lying down flatly. Use containers filled with fine, sifted sand. Leaf cuttings for certain succulents are much easier, even with only portions of the leaf. Insert the leaf piece just slightly into the soil and use hairpins to secure the veins tightly against the soil. Leave the pot untouched until new plants are visible.

Root cuttings are taken in early summer from growing roots 5cm long and 1cm thick. This process takes months of patience and should be left until rooted thoroughly. Use pots with balanced sand and peat moss to lay the cuttings horizontally and cover with 2 – 3cm of growing medium. Provide protection…

A division is done in different seasons for different plant types. Wait for the sun to set and dig the plant(s) up carefully. Gently pull it apart into sections with adequate roots for each section. Replant these divided sections in prepared holes. Water thoroughly and regularly for the next month.

Budding is ideally done on overcast days. Prepare the bud stick, with a sharp knife, for insertion. Using a knife cut the stem’s T-incision and inserts the bud. Tie in with bud tape.

Grafting is similar to budding and ideally done right before- or during the growing season. The basic principle of grafting is the perfect alignment of rootstock and shoot, held together tightly with a rubber band. Choose rootstock from a healthy plant with a sturdy stem of at least 1cm thickness. Cut and level the stem. Make a cut down the stem between two buds, taking off a strip as wide as your shoot and angled into the stem. When deep and long enough, make a sharp upwards/outward cut. Take a tip cutting with two leaves and copy the cut-out-part of the rootstock to create a tight fit. Match up the growing layers of both and bound tightly with grafting tape. There are several methods of grafting and some are best done in the greenhouse.

Layering is ideally done at the beginning of autumn and it could take some time before you can lift the new plants. Select long, elastic stems for layering. Make a cut underneath a bud, on the outside of the bending sections. Secure the stem down with pegs, replace with river sand around the cut and fill with soil, leaving the stem’s end above ground level. This method ensures nutrients from the parent plant while rooting. Once rooted it can be cut into sections of new plants.

Organic Vegetables and Propagation

Organic Vegetables and PropagationOrganic Vegetables and Propagation

Keep in mind the following thrive together: Beans and potatoes; peas and carrots; cabbage and beets; cabbage and spinach; cabbage and celery; cabbage and lettuce; peas and turnips; spinach and cauliflower; kohlrabi and beets; spinach and eggplant; corn and beans; corn and cucumbers.

And the following reject each other: Fennel and tomatoes; tomatoes and peas; tomatoes and potatoes; bush beans and onions; cabbages and onions; parsley and lettuce.

Semi-hardwood cuttings are taken during summer and will take 3 – 8 weeks to root. Make the cutting 15 cm long, with a bud near the top and place in a pot containing river sand, protect from sunlight and keep moist.

Hardwood cuttings are taken before the growing season and will take approximately 5 weeks to root. Ensure the top is just above a bud. Place these cuttings in river sand with 5 cm emerging above the sand. Keep moist, mulch with hay and provide sun protection.

Soft tip cuttings should be 10 cm long and taken in spring. Rooting may take place within in week to two weeks and keep constantly moist. The bottom cut should be made just beneath a node and the growing tip removed. Remove the foliage off and plant the lower half in a pot with river sand.

Leaf cuttings are probably the method least used, except in the case of certain plants where it’s the only option of cutting-propagation. With a sharp knife, make cuts into the veins at broad intervals before lying down flatly. Use containers filled with fine, sifted sand. Leaf cuttings for certain succulents are much easier, even with only portions of the leaf. Insert the leaf piece just slightly into the soil and use hairpins to secure the veins tightly against the soil. Leave the pot untouched until new plants are visible.

Growing Plants from Cuttings

Growing plants from cuttings allow you to share plants with friends and get them from friends. It is so easy to create a brand new plant from cuttings that you’ll find yourself wanting to propagate many of your garden and indoor plants this way.

The key to growing plants from cuttings is to select a very healthy plant from which to prune a cutting. Use very sharp pruners or scissors to remove young shoots from the parent plant. It is best to cut at an angle of 30-degrees, having a point on the end of the cutting.

Strip most of the leaves from the cutting, leaving a few at the end. All the lowest leaves should be removed. Then treat the cutting with a root growth enhancing powder. Simply dip the cutting into the powder and then place it in water, soil, or whatever growing medium you have selected. Some plants, like philodendron, do very well when cuttings are grown in plain water. Woodier plants should be placed in the soil in most cases.
If using water, place a very week fertilizer liquid into the water to provide added nutrition. Place the cutting away from direct sunlight so that it gets off to a good start. If planting in soil, no fertilizer should be applied right away but the cutting should be placed in partial shade.

You must keep your cutting moist in order to keep it growing well. However, avoid applying too much water, since this can cause the tender roots to begin rotting instead of thriving. You can mist the cuttings you are growing frequently without danger of too much water. Never allow the plants you are growing from cuttings to sit in water in the bottom drain pan. This will surely stunt them or kill them completely.
Once roots form, you can plant your cuttings in their final homes, either pots or in the outdoor soil. Carefully transplant and keep the newly planted young specimen out of direct sun and well-watered for a few days as it becomes accustomed to its new home.

Of course, if you are growing plants from cuttings to share with friends, you can give the newly propagated plant to your friend and allow them to place it in its final home. You’ll find your friends appreciate the gift and will very likely ask which of their plants you would like to have cuttings from and, thereby, return the favor.

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