All About Lilacs in your Home Garden

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All About Lilacs in your Home Garden

All About Lilacs in your Home GardenAll About Lilacs in your Home Garden

About Lilacs

Lilacs are average-sized, flowering shrubs. They are typically hardy to zones three through seven. Some types of lilacs are especially cold hardy and can survive in areas as cold as zone two. Lilacs are typically valued for their bright, fragrant blooms that appear during the spring months. Native to Europe and parts of Asia, lilacs make a wonderful addition to any garden.

Lilacs have blooms that appear in clusters. The small, often fragrant flowers range in color from white to pink and all shades of purple. There are even some lilacs that have yellow blooms. Lilacs, known by the scientific name syringa, are very long-lived and capable of surviving most conditions. The common lilacs have an upright, irregular growth habit that works well in the back of a border.

Aside from the bright blooms in spring, most lilacs do not have any other seasonal interest. Lilacs prefer full sun in neutral, rich soil that is high in organic matter. They typically require a location with good air circulation, to help reduce problems with powdery mildew, one of the biggest problems of lilacs. Some cultivars of lilacs produce good flowers only every other year. Spent blossoms of lilacs should be removed immediately, to encourage increased output of flowering the following year. Old plants should be renewed by being cut back almost to the ground.

Lilacs look lovely in nearly every garden. The many shades of lilac flowers allow for at least one plant that will either complement or contrast every garden perfectly. There are hundreds of cultivars of lilacs and even some lilacs that grow similarly to trees. Lilacs have a variety of uses in every garden.

What is a Lilac

Lilac is a deciduous, blossoming bush. Local to Europe and Asia, a lilac plant can be naturalized pretty much anyplace on the planet that has the best possible developing conditions. A lilac requires full daylight to develop however will get by in incomplete shade to the detriment of upset blooming. Lilac plants likewise incline toward soil that is reliably clammy and well-depleted, with a high substance of the natural issue.

The blossoms of lilac are in enormous groups toward the finish of woody stems. Lilac plants have fragrant blossoms that can be appealing to butterflies. The blossom time of a lilac bush starts at some point between the center of May through the finish of June. A lilac bush will sprout for just half a month, however, this time can be stretched out by four to about a month and a half by planting lilacs from various species together in the nursery.

Lilac plants generally need a location in the garden that has good air circulation, but not any damaging wind, as they are fairly brittle. Bunches of lilac plants should have space between the plants in order for them to grow out, instead of up. Allowing a lilac to grow out will increase the flowering, as well as encourage flowering throughout the entire plant, as opposed to just the top area.

If more flowering is desired for the following year from a lilac plant, spent blooms should be removed within one week of when they are spent. This will allow the lilac plant to focus its energy on creating more buds, and not seeds. As with any other landscaping plant, pruning of a lilac should be done immediately after the flowering period has ended. A lilac should be pruned down gradually, sometimes over a period of years. Too much pruning of lilac at one time can have the effect of limiting flower production for up to two years.

Dwarf Korean Lilac

The dwarf Korean lilac bush is known as a compact, but spreading plant. It usually has small foliage and lavender-purple flowers. The blooms of a dwarf Korean lilac bush spread out ever the entire canopy of the shrub. The dwarf Korean lilac bush is deciduous and very tolerant to pollution and slight disturbances, such as wind. This makes a dwarf Korean lilac bush perfect for any urban garden.

The dwarf Korean lilac bush, or Syringa meyeri ‘palibin,’ has hollow stems, like many other lilac plants. They are native to Korea and China, as well as other parts of eastern Asia. The dwarf Korean lilac bush is widely used as a foundation, mass planting, and informal hedge or specimen shrub. One of the most compact lilac plants, the dwarf Korean lilac bush will only grow to a mature height of four to five feet. This makes them perfect for smaller locations.

Dwarf Korean lilac bushes have good, tough foliage that is a rich green. They are, however, most often requested due to their beautiful blooms. A dwarf Korean lilac bush needs moist, well-draining soil and as much direct sunlight as possible to grow fully. They need a minimum of six hours of full sunlight daily in order to bloom properly. The dwarf Korean lilac bush is rarely bothered by powdery mildew, but good air circulation should be provided nonetheless.

Dwarf Korean lilac bushes bloom in late spring, and the flowers are very fragrant and beautiful. They are hardy to zones three through seven. Dwarf Korean lilac bushes are easy to grow, and due to their compact size makes them good selections for any home garden or small landscape. They are very adaptable to different soil conditions.

Growing Lilacs

Growing lilacs is a fun and easy activity for any gardener. Lilacs are relatively easy to care for if the proper conditions are given. Most lilac plants require full sun, yet some will tolerate partial shade, at the expense of fewer and smaller blooms. Lilac plants also need a good amount of moisture in the soil to thrive, but standing water may cause rot. The best thing to do when growing lilac is to mulch heavily near the base of the plant. This will allow the soil to maintain moisture and also provide shade for the root system.

Growing lilacs should be done in a location with a good amount of soil drainage. While they are drought-tolerant, growing lilac plants do need a good deal of moisture in order to thrive properly. They should be watered regularly to ensure that the soil is moist. Growing lilac shrubs can be done in areas all over the world, as there are lilacs that can thrive in zones from two to ten.

Another important aspect of growing lilacs is how and when to prune. Pruning lilacs differently will result in different bloom times and quantities. Lilacs should all be pruned as soon as the bloom period has ended. Pruning should consist of removing any spent blooms to increase the likelihood of more flowers the following year. The stems and branches of growing lilac bushes may also be cut back, as long as not more that one-third of the plant is cut. Pruning more than this will reduce the number of blooms the following year, and may even prevent blooms from appearing for up to four years.

More information on growing lilacs can be found online at the garden center help sites and nursery web pages. Local libraries will have books dealing with growing lilac and other garden plants. Also, local garden centers and nurseries will be able to provide the most correct information relative to the particular region.

Japanese Lilac Tree

Japanese Lilac Tree

A Japanese lilac tree is very similar to a lilac bush, except that it grows more upright and has a wider trunk. A Japanese lilac tree can grow to a height of thirty feet and usually has a rounded, upright shape. The Japanese lilac tree is the most common of all lilac trees. The Japanese lilac tree is hardy to zones three through seven and has creamy white flowers appearing in early summer. The spade-shaped leaves of this lilac tree are dark green and deciduous.

The flowers of a Japanese lilac tree are similar to those on a lilac bush but generally, have smaller individual blossoms. The range of color is also more limited, usually only cream to pink, but some purple cultivars have been introduced. The blooms generally appear after those of lilac bushes and will last about the same length of time. Therefore, planting a Japanese lilac tree behind a row of lilac bushes will allow for the lilac blooming season to be extended by a few weeks.

A Japanese lilac tree should be protected from damage caused by wind and other natural sources, as well as human damage. This is because Japanese lilac trees take a fairly long time to recover from damage. When damaged enough, Japanese lilac trees may not bloom for a few years, as they are focusing their energy on repairing the damage instead of making new buds. The wood of Japanese lilac trees is softer than that of some of the larger trees, and can, therefore, be damaged more easily. Japanese lilac trees have fragrant blooms and will provide a good amount of shade.

A Japanese lilac tree should be planted in a location of full sunlight, just like all other lilacs. When pruning, it is important not to remove too much from a Japanese lilac tree, as this will likely reduce the flower output the following year, in much the same way that damaging the tree with wind will. When cared for properly and given the proper growing conditions, a Japanese lilac tree can easily survive for nearly one hundred years.

Lilac Bushes

Lilac Bushes

One of the most beautiful types of a shrub that one can plant in their garden is a lilac bush. A lilac bush has large clusters of beautifully fragrant blooms that appear from mid-spring and remain until mid-summer. Lilac bushes make a wonderful addition to any border, and can also be used as a single specimen plant for their beautiful fragrance. The foliage of a lilac bush will add life to a border, even after all the blooms have been spent.

One of the most lovely of all lilac bushes is the Chinese lilac. This lilac bush is a large, round-headed shrub that works well either as a specimen or a border or screen plant. The excellent floral display of this lilac bush begins in early May. The flower color is lilac purple, and the bloom bunches are four to five inches long. The fragrant blooms cover most of this lilac bush and will be even more prevalent in full sun conditions. This lilac bush is hardy to zones three through seven.

Another popular lilac bush is the ‘White Persian.’ These lilac bushes are widely adaptable to a variety of soil conditions. The dark green foliage makes a wonderful contrast to the creamy white blooms, which appear in late spring. This lilac bush grows very compactly, making it a wonderful choice for smaller gardens. Butterflies often frequent the fragrant flowers. Growing to a height of four to eight feet, these lilac bushes are hardy to zones three through seven.

One of the coldest hardiest of the lilac bushes is the ‘James Macfarlane.’ This lilac bush can grow in regions as cold as parts of zone two, to as warm as zone seven. The true pink blooms on these lilac bushes bloom in early June and flower freely. These elegant lilac bushes have an upright shape, making them perfect for a border or screen planting. When planted in full sunlight, this lilac bush can reach a mature height of up to eight feet.

Lilac Cultivars

Lilac Cultivars

There are many different lilac cultivars. They come in many different sizes and colors of bloom. Most blooms are a light purple, but there are also lilac cultivars with blooms that are white, yellow, or pink. Lilac cultivars range in hardiness from zones two through ten. While the bloom period of lilac is only for a few short weeks, planting several different lilac cultivars together can make a bloom period that lasts up to four months.

One of the most common lilac cultivars is the purple lilac, or Syringa vulgaris. These lilac cultivars have bright purple blooms that appear in bunches around late May. Hardy in zones three through seven, these lilac cultivars have one of the most powerful fragrances emitted by any flower. They are commonly used for indoor floral displays and as centerpieces on a table. These lilac cultivars will grow easily in nearly any garden.

Another of the popular lilac cultivars is the white Persian. The fragrant white blooms on these lilac cultivars make them one of the most lovely and pure of all lilacs. Reaching four to six feet in height, these lilac cultivars make a wonderful foundation planting or garden border. These lilac cultivars are also hardy in zones three through seven. The fast growth rate makes them one of the most often requested of all lilac cultivars.

A third common lilac cultivar is James Macfarlane. These lilac cultivars are among the most winter hardy and can survive in areas as cold as zone two. They will grow to a height of eight feet, with a mature spread of from six to eight feet. These lilac cultivars bloom around two weeks later than the common purple lilac cultivars and work perfectly when planted in masses with them. This will increase the total bloom time of these lilacs to up to three weeks.

Lilac Flowers

One of the major reasons that people plant lilac bushes in their gardens is for the beautiful blooms. Lilac flowers are very lovely. They range in color from white to yellow, pink to deep purple, and everything in between. Lilac flowers are often are generally very fragrant and often bell-shaped. Lilac flowers will make a wonderful display from mid-spring, through summer. Lilac flowers will usually only bloom for a few short weeks, but planting several different species of lilac with different bloom times can increase the blooming season by up to six weeks.

Lilac flowers will also make excellent cut flowers for indoor displays. The sweet fragrance the blooms emit is often too strong to be in a room without good ventilation. The best candidate for display flowers are lilac flowers that have nearly all flowerets open. The stem should be cut several inches below the flower. Lilac flowers removed from a bush should always be spaced out, to allow for a fully blooming bush to be left behind.

Most of all of the leaves should be trimmed back from the lilac flower. Then, the bloom should be placed in a vase of water. Lilac flowers look best in a vase when they are in groups, whereas roses work fine alone. Lilac flowers in a vase should be kept in a cool location, out of direct sunlight. This will help to prolong the indoor life. Lilac flowers make a great centerpiece of a kitchen table.

Lilac flowers are also often used to add fragrance to perfumes and soaps. The intoxicating smell will last for weeks when the blooms are cared for properly. Lilac flowers are believed to bloom profusely only every other year or so. This is not the case. In order to ensure a full crop of lilac flowers year after year, the spent blooms should be removed as soon as the bloom has ended. This will force the plant to focus on creating buds for the following year flowers, as opposed to making seeds.

Lilac Plants

Lilac plants come in a variety of shapes and sizes. There are lilac plants that grow small and rounded. There are lilac plants that grow tall and conical. Lilac plants can range anywhere in height from only a foot or so to twenty feet high. The type of lilac plant used depends on the desired result.

Lilac plants are almost always deciduous. This means that they will lose their leaves once the winter has set in. This will often result in a mass of twigs and sticks that is not very pleasing to the eye. Lilac plants are generally only requested for their masses of beautifully fragrant blooms, so many gardeners will be able to tolerate a lilac plant with no winter foliage.

There are lilac plants that grow in nearly every climate on the planet, from zones as cold as two to zones as warm as ten. The look of a row of lilac plants can either be formally pruned or more naturally grown. Lilac plants grown in a row are usually more commonly informal, but formal lilacs have their own qualities. Formal lilac plants are often pruned into a more circular shape than hedges, which are often very rectangular.


There are a variety of uses for lilac plants. The fragrant blooms add color and romance to a spring garden. The blooms of lilac plants are often cut and brought indoors for a lovely kitchen centerpiece. Lilac plants that grow to fifteen or more feet can be used for a beautiful privacy screen. Lilacs can also make an excellent border or foundation plantings. A single lilac plant placed in a prominent location of a garden makes a wonderful specimen plant.

Lilac Shrub

Lilac shrubs can be a great addition to any garden. They can serve several purposes in any landscape situation. Lilac shrubs will provide protection to small animals and give homes to birds. Tightly grown lilac shrubs will keep unwanted pests, such as rabbits out of a garden. Lilac shrubs grown tall can make a wonderful privacy fence. The beautiful and fragrant blooms of lilac shrubs will provide color and fragrance to a garden for most of the spring months and often well into summer as well.

Small, compact lilac shrubs give protection to animals such as squirrels and rabbits. The animals will build nests inside the protection of lilac shrubs. Taller lilac shrubs will provide the right amount of protection for a bird’s nest. Low growing dense lilac shrubs can act as a fence, keeping animals out of the garden. Lilac shrubs look nicer and will usually outlast a fence.

Lilac shrubs will make a perfect privacy fence. Lilac shrubs that grow to eight feet tall will make an attractive alternative to a fence. Lilac shrub privacy fences have many advantages to their manmade counterparts. First of all, they are less expensive. Secondly, lilac shrubs are more beautiful in terms of color and form, and the fragrance is much more attractive than wood or metal. In addition, they can be controlled by pruning, giving them a nice, formal shape, or left informal for a more naturalistic approach.

Lilac shrubs add a wonderful touch of class and grace to a garden. The color of the blooms will make a wonderful addition. The range of colors available meant that no matter what the color scheme of a garden, there is always a lilac shrub that will either complement of contrast with its location perfectly. They also create a border of living material that adds greenery and form during the growing season.

Lilac Trees

Lilac trees are very similar to lilac bushes, except that they grow more upright and have a wider trunk. Lilac trees can grow to a height of thirty feet, and usually have a rounded, upright shape. The most common of the lilac trees are the Japanese lilac tree. The Japanese lilac tree is hardy to zones three through seven and has creamy white flowers appearing in early summer. The heart-shaped leaves of this lilac tree are dark green and deciduous.

The flowers of lilac trees are similar to those on lilac bushes but generally, have smaller individual blossoms. The range of color is also more limited, usually only cream to pink, but some purple cultivars have been introduced. The blooms generally appear after those of lilac bushes and will last about the same length of time.

Lilac trees should be protected from damage caused by wind and other natural sources, as well as human damage. This is because lilac trees take a fairly long time to recover from damage. The wood of lilac trees is softer than that of some of the larger trees, and can, therefore, be damaged more easily. Lilac trees have fragrant blooms and will provide a good amount of shade.

A lilac tree should be planted in a location of full sunlight, just like all other lilacs. When pruning, it is important not to remove too much from a lilac tree, as this will likely reduce the flower output the following year. When cared for properly and given the proper growing conditions, a lilac tree can easily survive for nearly one hundred years.

Miss Kim Lilac

Miss Kim Lilac

Miss Kim lilac is one of the most beautiful and fragrant of all lilac bushes. The light lavender blooms stand out nicely against the background of the dark, glossy green foliage. As with all lilacs, the Miss Kim lilac prefers full sun to thrive, but will also live in areas of partial shade, at the expense of fewer blooms. The green foliage turns a deep burgundy red in the autumn months, making the Miss Kim lilac one of the most beautiful of the lilacs in the fall as well.

Miss Kim lilac is a very popular shrub for many reasons. The blooms have one of the most intoxicating scents of all flowers. Miss Kim lilac is even more fragrant than roses. The compact and upright rounded form makes them perfect for either border plants or for a specimen planting. Miss Kim lilac will grow to a height of six to seven feet with a mature spread of five to six feet. This makes it small enough to be manageable in nearly every garden.

The Miss Kim lilac, unlike many other lilac shrubs, is very resistant to powdery mildew. Unfortunately, it is not as drought resistant as some of its cousins. When faced with a prolonged period of drought, the Miss Kim lilac will often shed much of its foliage. Thought by many to be the number one lilac in the midwestern United States, the Miss Kim lilac was originally native to Korea.

Miss Kim lilac bushes are an excellent addition to any home garden or landscape. They are hardy to zones three through seven. Miss Kim lilac bushes are able to adapt to a wide range of soil conditions. Miss Kim lilac bushes, with their compact form, make excellent foundation plantings. No garden is complete without a Miss Kim lilac bush.

Purple Lilac

Purple Lilac

There are many different colors to the blooms of lilac plants. They can range from white to yellow, and pink to purple. Many of the colors will also change as the summer progresses. One of the most commonly requested colors of lilac blooms is the purple lilac. These bunches purple blooms on the end of long stems give a lovely color to any garden from springtime through summer.

One of the most popular purple lilacs is the Syringa vulgaris or common purple lilac. This purple lilac is hardy to zones three through seven. It prefers full sunlight, just as all lilac plants do. The common purple lilac will grow to a mature height of eight to ten feet, with an equal mature spread. The upright form of this purple lilac makes it a wonderful candidate for a privacy screen. The fragrance emitted by this purple lilac is one of the most powerful scents from any flower. It works well as a hedge or accent plant.

Another highly requested purple lilac is the Persian lilac. This purple lilac is hardy to zones three through seven as well and has wonderful lavender blooms. Growing shorter than the common purple lilac, the Persian will reach a height of only about four to eight feet. The shorter height makes this purple lilac a great choice for a border or foundation planting. The arching branches of this purple lilac make it look very graceful, even once the foliage has fallen off in the winter.

A third popular purple lilac is the Chinese lilac. This purple lilac has lavender blooms that sometimes acquire a slightly pink hue. Also hardy in zones three through seven, this purple lilac has an upright, rounded form. They will reach a height of six to twelve feet with an equal mature spread. Used as a single specimen, this purple lilac produces an excellent floral display in early May.

Persian Lilac

The Persian lilac is a fast-growing deciduous tree from southwestern Asia. The leaves of the Persian lilac can reach up to two feet in length, and light green in color. The blooms of a Persian lilac are violet or lavender, and appear in late spring, on into early summer. Caution should be taken, as the seeds of a Persian lilac can be very poisonous if ingested by humans. Many gardeners choose to grow Persian lilac plants solely for their large, beautiful foliage.

Persian lilac plants can be invasive if care is not taken to control their growth. Attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds, the Persian lilac has very fragrant flowers. They are suitable for growing indoors, provided that the location selected allows for a good deal of direct sunlight daily. Not enough, generally less than six hours, direct sunlight can severely limit the amount and size of the beautiful and fragrant blooms.

The Persian lilac needs an average amount of water, with well-drained soil. Standing water in the soil makes the plant very susceptible to root rot. The best way to propagate Persian lilac plants is from softwood cuttings. The seed sown indoors can propagate Persian lilacs, but this generally takes around five years before blooms are produced. Division can also propagate Persian lilacs, as long as care is taken to prevent damage to the root system. Damaging the root system of Persian lilac bushes will inhibit the flowering for up to three years.

Hardy to zones three through seven, Persian lilac plants will grow to a height of from four to eight feet, with a mature spread of five to ten feet. The rounded and low mature form makes the Persian lilac a perfect plant to be used in a foundation planting or as a border plant. The blooms can be cut and taken indoors for a lovely scent and floral display, but the fragrance can be overwhelming if not enough ventilation is provided.

Propagating Lilacs

Propagating lilacs is an easy process, and there are a few different ways that one can go about it. It is generally about three years before lilacs are able to create blooms once they have been planted in a region. Most lilacs are purchased from garden supply stored and are already grown for a few seasons. In these cases, it may take fewer years to see the lovely blooms. Propagating lilacs in a home garden can be a fun and rewarding experience.

A second way of propagating lilacs is to grow them from small shoots taken from an existing plant. Shoots that are one or two feet tall should be selected for best results. The plant should be dug up deeply, to ensure that as much of the root system is removed as possible. The root system should be strong and full before this type of propagating lilacs can be attempted. The main root should be attached to the mother plant, and clippers should be used to cut the selected shoot from the main bush. The new shoot can then be planted in the desired location. This should be done in a time of colder weather, to increase the survival rate. Three to five shots should be planted in each area for this type of propagating lilacs to work best.

Propagating lilacs can also be done from seed, although this is an uncommon way. After the growing season, the seeds can be harvested from the dead flowers. This should be done once the flowers have dried out, but before they fall out of the seedpods. Propagating lilacs from seed takes time and patience. It may take up to five or six years for the first bloom to appear. This is one of the reasons that propagating lilacs from seed is not as common as other approaches.

Propagating lilacs from seed is most commonly left to horticulturalists and garden centers or nurseries. When propagating lilacs from seed, the blooms can be cross-pollinated manually, to create new and exciting hybrids. This will take many years to accomplish but is well worth the wait for the gardener who is getting tired of the same routine year after year in the garden.

Pruning Lilacs

Pruning lilacs is a fun activity and the results are worth any effort that took place. A perfectly pruned lilac bush is lovely for the entire growing season. Even once the blooms have all been spent, the resulting shape of the foliage remaining adds a great amount of summer and autumn interest. Pruning lilac bushes is pretty easy and straightforward. When pruning lilacs, it is important to remember a few facts about how lilacs grow.

The first step to pruning a lilac bush is to decide what the overall outcome will be. Pruning lilacs should be done over a period of a few years, as they do not recover very well from extreme pruning, often not flowering for up to two years. Pruning lilacs should always be done on wood that is at least three years old. Since lilacs bloom on older wood, pruning new wood every year may limit the number of blooms in the next few years. Lilacs also produce buds that will turn into flowers early once the current blooms have been spent. It is important to understand that removing too much in the summer or fall can drastically reduce the number of blooms for the following year.

Pruning lilacs should always be done immediately after the blooming season has ended. Spent blooms should be cut off as soon as they are done. This will help prevent the plant from creating seeds, and instead focus its energy on the buds for the following year’s bloom. Pruning lilacs should almost always be done by hand. Using electrical trimmers makes the top of the bush flat, and this is not an attractive look for lilac bushes. Lilacs look much more appealing with a more rounded figure.

Pruning lilacs is a fun and rewarding experience. Gardeners all over the world prune their lilacs to different shapes and sizes. Pruning lilacs will not only allow a gardener to decide the form of the plant, but also the size. Lilacs can easily grow to almost twenty feet tall. Many gardens do not have enough room for a bush of that size. Pruning lilac bushes down to size allows smaller gardens to have enough room for these lovely plants. More information about pruning lilacs can be found in any local garden center or nursery.

Transplanting Lilac Bushes

Transplanting lilac bushes is a fairly straightforward process. It is very similar to the act of transplanting most other bushes or shrubs. Transplanting lilac bushes should always be done in the autumn months. Transplanting lilac bushes in warmer, windier weather will increase the likelihood of the root system drying out. The first step is to dig around the plant and fairly deep. The underground root structure of a lilac bush can sometimes get pretty large, and it is important not to damage any roots if possible.

Once the plant is up, remove much of the soil from around the roots. This can be done using water or lightly shaking the roots. Once the soil has been removed, select a new location for the plant. For best results when transplanting lilac bushes, the new hole should be dug before removing the plant from its current location. This will limit the amount of time that the plant spends out of the ground. Ensure that the new location will satisfy the needs of the plant. There should be a good amount of direct sunlight each day, a minimum of six hours, and also good drainage of water.

The hole should be large enough to house the entire root system freely, and not in a large clump. Spread out the roots and add soil a little bit at a time and press firmly to remove any air pockets and reinforce the support for the plant. The crown of the lilac bush, where the roots come together, should be just an inch or so beneath the surface of the soil, as the roots need air to grow. Now, the plant must be watered gently, to ensure the roots are in contact with the soil. When transplanting lilac bushes, there is no such thing as being too careful to the roots. Damaging roots while transplanting lilac bushes can severely decrease the chance of survival.

Transplanting lilac bushes is often done for a variety of reasons. One reason is that the plant may not be thriving in its current location. This may be for several reasons, including not enough sun or soil drainage. Another reason for transplanting lilac bushes is to create a better screen for wind or unattractive sights.

Lilac Care

Lilac care is pretty easy for any gardener to do. Lilac bushes are known for their ability to survive in many different situations that would oftentimes kill other plants and shrubs. Many lilacs are relatively drought tolerant and will survive with the heavy pollution of urban areas.

The most important part of lilac care is watering them. Lilac bushes will need a fair amount of water during the hotter summer months, but not a whole lot. Once established, lilac bushes will survive with watering as infrequently as once a month. Lilac bushes will also grow better when given a light fertilizer in the early spring months. The best place for a lilac bush to be planted is in an area that has full direct sunlight. While some lilacs will grow in shade, this is often at the expense of fewer and smaller blooms.

Another part of lilac care is pruning. Most lilac shrubs will only flower on growth that is three or more years old. This means that too much pruning of a lilac bush will often result in fewer blooms, and in extreme cases, no blooms at all. Pruning of lilac bushes should always be done gradually, over a period of up to three years. This will ensure that the bush will flower during this time.

More information about lilac care can be found at any local nursery or garden center. They would have information particular to the local climate and soil conditions. Lilac care information found online could also be helpful but in a more general sense. Whatever the source, ensure that the information pertaining to lilac care is from a trusted, and credible source.

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